FreeBSD

This guide is based on FreeBSD-11.4-STABLE.

Install FreeBSD-11.4-STABLE from Vagrant box (optional)


Vagrant provides a simple way to create and deploy Virtual Machines from pre-built images using VirtualBox, libvirt, or VMWare as a hypervisor engine. This allows the user to quickly create a virtual machine without the hassle of installing the operating system by hand.

Install Vagrant


The instructions to install Vagrant are provided at vagrantup.com.

Create a FreeBSD-11.4-STABLE Virtual Machine using Vagrant


Use the supplied Vagrantfile in the vagrant directory to create the virtual machine.

Note that this Vagrantfile is identical to the base FreeBSD 11 box, with the exception that the amount of virtual memory has been increased to 1GB:

cd vagrant/freebsd
vagrant up --provider virtualbox

Log into the newly created FreeBSD VM


Use SSH to log into the FreeBSD 11 VM:

vagrant ssh

Note that the Open5GS source is not copied into the VM. The instructions below provide the step by step instructions for setting up Open5GS for either a bare metal or virtual FreeBSD 11 system.

The rest of the commands below are performed inside the FreeBSD VM as the user ‘vagrant’, or on your bare metal FreeBSD 11 system as any normal user.

Getting MongoDB


Install MongoDB with package manager.

$ sudo pkg install mongodb44

Run MongoDB server.

$ mkdir -p ./data/db
$ mongod --dbpath ./data/db

Setting up network (No persistent after rebooting)


Configure the loopback interface.

$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.2 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.3 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.4 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.5 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.5 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.6 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.7 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.8 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.9 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.10 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.11 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.12 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.13 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.14 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.15 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.16 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.17 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.18 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.19 netmask 255.255.255.255
$ sudo ifconfig lo0 alias 127.0.0.20 netmask 255.255.255.255

Enable IP forwarding

$ sudo sysctl -w net.inet.ip.forwarding=1
$ sudo sysctl -w net.inet6.ip6.forwarding=1

Tip: The script provided in $GIT_REPO/misc/netconf.sh makes it easy to configure the TUN device as follows: $ sudo ./misc/netconf.sh

Building Open5GS


Install the depedencies for building the source code.

$ sudo pkg install meson ninja gcc bison gsed pkgconf git mongo-c-driver gnutls libgcrypt libidn libyaml libmicrohttpd nghttp2 talloc

Configure gcc PATH

$ setenv LIBRARY_PATH /usr/local/lib
$ setenv C_INCLUDE_PATH /usr/local/include

If you are using BASH instead of default CSH,

$ export LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/local/lib
$ export C_INCLUDE_PATH=/usr/local/include

Git clone.

$ git clone https://github.com/open5gs/open5gs

To compile with meson:

$ cd open5gs
$ meson build --prefix=`pwd`/install
$ ninja -C build

Note: No source code changes are required for FreeBSD 11.x version. However, in FreeBSD 12.x version, we’ll getting a crash with segmentation fault when calling basename(3). To avoid this, you need to change the freeDiameter source code as below.

$ cd open5gs/subprojects/freeDiameter

$ diff --git a/include/freeDiameter/libfdproto.h b/include/freeDiameter/libfdproto.h
index 52c11ef..cd7f383 100644
--- a/include/freeDiameter/libfdproto.h
+++ b/include/freeDiameter/libfdproto.h
@@ -293,7 +293,7 @@ extern int fd_g_debug_lvl;

 /* A version of __FILE__ without the full path. This is specific to each C file being compiled */
 static char * file_bname = NULL;
-static char * file_bname_init(char * full) { file_bname = basename(full); return file_bname; }
+static char * file_bname_init(char * full) { file_bname = __old_basename(full); return file_bname; }
 #define __STRIPPED_FILE__      (file_bname ?: file_bname_init((char *)__FILE__))

Now, compile again:

$ cd open5gs
$ ninja -C build

Check whether the compilation is correct.

Note: This should require sudo due to access /dev/tun0.

$ sudo ./build/tests/attach/attach ## EPC Only
$ sudo ./build/tests/registration/registration ## 5G Core Only

Run all test programs as below.

Note: This should require sudo due to access /dev/tun0.

$ cd build
$ sudo meson test -v

Tip: You can also check the result of ninja -C build test with a tool that captures packets. If you are running wireshark, select the loopback interface and set FILTER to s1ap || gtpv2 || pfcp || diameter || gtp || ngap || http2.data.data || http2.headers. You can see the virtually created packets. testattach.pcapng/testregistration.pcapng

You need to perform the installation process.

$ cd build
$ ninja install
$ cd ../

Building WebUI of Open5GS


Node.js is required to build WebUI of Open5GS

$ sudo pkg install node

Install the dependencies to run WebUI

$ cd webui
$ npm ci --no-optional

The WebUI runs as an npm script.

$ npm run dev